100 Great Mathematicians
  1. Thales of Miletus
  2. Pythagoras
  3. Zeno
  4. Democritus
  5. Eudoxus
  6. Euclid
  7. Archimedes
  8. Apollonius
  9. Eratosthenes
  10. Ptolemy
  11. Diophantus
  12. Pappus
  13. Brahmagupta
  14. Al_Khowarismi
On the following pages, I have compiled articles on great
mathematicians. Eventually there will be 100 of them.

The History of mathematics can be divided into four main sections:
  • Antiquity
  • The Dark Ages
  • The Renaissance
  • Modern

I will start with some of the great mathematicians from
Antiquity:
Next the Middle Ages:
  1. Fibonacci
  2. Oresme
  3. Regiomontanus
  4. Nicolas Chuquet
  5. Tartaglia
  6. Cardano
  7. Robert Recorde
Atheism is so senseless & odious to mankind that it never had many professors. Can it be by accident
that all birds beasts& men have their right side & left side alike shaped (except in their bowells) & just
two eyes & no more on either side the face & just two ears on either side the head & a nose with two
holes & no more between the eyes & one mouth under the nose & either two fore leggs or two wings or
two arms on the sholders & two leggs on the hipps one on either side & no more? Whence arises this
uniformity in all their outward shapes but from the counsel & contrivance of an Author? Whence is it
that the eyes of all sorts of living creatures are transparent to the very bottom & the only transparent
members in the body, having on the outside an hard transparent skin, & within transparent juyces with
a crystalline Lens in the middle & a pupil before the Lens all of them so truly shaped & fitted for vision,
that no Artist can mend them? Did blind chance know that there was light & what was its refraction & fit
the eys of all creaturesafter the most curious manner to make use of it? These & such like
considerations always have & ever will prevail with man kind to beleive that there is a being who made
all things & has all things in his power & who is therfore to be feared.

'A short Schem of the true Religion' by Sir Isaac Newton (1643 - 1727), the great English
mathematician, astronomer and physicist, and President of the Royal Society.